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The Ale List: B.I.G. plans first ‘Holiday Hangover’ Fest

Breweries in the Gorge (B.I.G.) is offering its first “Holiday Hangover Brew Fest” in downtown Hood River. B.I.G. is a non-profit organization that is comprised of 12 breweries located in the Columbia Gorge region of Washington and Oregon, spanning from Washougal to The Dalles.

On Jan. 14 from noon to 8 p.m., each brewery will be featuring a variety of beer, live music, local food carts, and specialty beer tappings throughout the day.

The event is 21-and-over.

“We’re stoked to be a part of the first-ever Holiday Hangover Brew Fest. The Elks Lodge is the perfect location. Not only is it located in the heart of downtown Hood River, it is a great set up for live music and for a fun winter beer gathering,” said Full Sail Pub General Manager and B.I.G. Bi-law Manager, Lisa Merkin.

In addition to regionally crafted beer, the brew fest will have local food carts on site: Solstice Mobile Pizza and Catering & El Riconcito

Also available are limited edition silkscreened Holiday Hangover Brew Fest posters available for purchase, as well as music with DJ Magnetwork and a live performance by old-time folk, rock ‘n roll one-man band McDougall, presented by Best Western Plus Hood River Inn.

Admission is $25 and includes a collector’s glass and 10 drink tickets; cash at the door or advance tickets available at www.merctickets. com/events/40141793/holiday-hangover-brew-fest.

WSJ boosts Logsdon

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales of Hood River gained a rarified mention in the Dec. 24-25 Wall Street Journal “Off Duty” section.

The article, “This is My Beer,” by William Bostwick, is subtitled “A road map to major regional styles,” and divides U.S. beer into seven regions, including Northwest (Oregon, Washington, and Idaho), plus all of California minus Los Angeles south, which is “So. Cal.” The others are Mountain, Southwest, MidWest, Southeast and Northeast.

A sidebar, titled “Cascadian Sour” (essentially the Journal’s stream-styling of all Northwest beers) includes Logsdon Farmhouse les Peche and Brett (10 percent ABV), along with Portland’s Cascade Kriek (8.2 percent ABV), and a Santa Adairius Rustic Ales (California) West Astley (7.3 percent ABV).

Of the Peche and Brett, the writers say, “Wild yeast and farm-fresh peaches, a half a pound per gallon, give a fuzzy, floral dryness with wisp;s of fruit like an orchard on the breeze.”

Which is probably as good a description as you’ll find of Logsdon’s hallmark ale.

Micro-brewery owners and the industry in general discourages over-consumption of a product that we have all come to hold in regard foremost not as an intoxicant but for its quality and culinary computability, so invoking “hangover” surprised me when I got word about the B.I.G. event Jan. 14. Of course, the hangover refers to the wooziness we feel from the overly-hectic holiday season itself.

At least one Oregon brewery did make jest of the word. I came across it in, of all things, my family’s annual Christmas “gag gift” exchange last month: the matchbook-sized “Hangover Helper,” containing towelette, antacid, ibuprofen, and a stick of gum, all courtesy of Redmond’s Cascade Lakes brewery. The promo piece was handed out at last year’s central Oregon Winter Ale Fest, and it was in a bag from my brother Joel, an expert fermenter and owner for 18 years of Corvallis Brewing Supply. He has accrued an eclectic variety of beer-related shwag and relics, and the gag gift also included a dust-covered can of MASH 4077 beer and a baseball with a hole drilled in it — “tap handle!” Joel explained. No, I have no plans to drink the MASH beer.

— Kirby Neumann-Rea

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