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Letters to the Editor for Jan. 3

Girls Up bike mission succeeds

Hood River Valley High School Girl Up is proud to announce that with the tremendous support from this community, we will be sending 100 Bikes to Malawi and Guatemala through the United Nations School Cycle Initiative.

Since Aug. 1, we have held a variety of fundraisers. We sold bags of coffee to the community, hosted a three-part movie series, presented the School Cycle initiative to local organizations and, on Giving Tuesday, we sent out an email to friends and family asking for donations that were being matched by Fabletics, a company that sponsors Girl Up. In total, we have raised $12,500. That means 100 girls in Malawi and Guatemala will be able to safely travel to school.

Fundraising is only one aspect of what we have accomplished this fall.

We made calls and sent over 150 Advocacy cards to Senators Walden and Merkley, asking them to support Protecting Girls’ Access to Education Act (S.1580). In addition, we made a video about the negative effects that ending DACA will have on many of their classmates and sent that to our representatives. We have big plans for the spring, so stay tuned and thank you again for supporting Girl Up!

Grace Skakel

HRVHS Girl Up Secretary Keep it local I don’t often disagree with Steve Curley, but I think I do this time over his plea that we farm out a new bridge to some corporate entity that will make future money off it.

Why take less now when we could finance it ourselves and keep the revenues for county improvements?

Chicago sold its parking meters to Kuwait and now cannot, e.g., have street parties without paying them for “their losses.“ Greece is being pressured to sell national (world!) treasures.

Puerto Rico might wind up the new rich folks’ Hawaii with residents moved to Florida and all because of the forced “need” to take less in order to get it now.

Curley implies we could spend the same amount now to upgrade our beautiful bridge that a new one would cost. Why not decide which way to go but keep it in the county family and out of already full corporate pockets?

Bob Williams

Hood River

‘Explain’

This is once again regards to the Eagle Creek fire. Thanks, Regena Rafelson, for your critique of my letter of Dec. 20. I actually think we’re closer on this issue than you might think. Your letter also keeps this issue in front of the public and District Attorney John Sewell.

Most of your letter addresses my support of charging the teen as an adult. Just to be clear, nowhere in my four letters to the editor of the Hood River News did I advocate this or seek revenge. I’m simply asking Sewell to explain why he chose to try the accused as a juvenile rather than as an adult (among other questions). I can understand why that might be construed as support for charging him as an adult. My issue is actually more with Sewell than with the accused. John, communicate to your constituents! Communicate and I and your constituents might actually agree with you! We’re not lawyers, explain it to us!

Also, Regena mentioned, “... have you ever exceeded the posted speed limit” or “... removed the content label from your mattress?“ Yes and no, I don’t even know where the content label is. The operative concept here is accountability. If I exceed the speed limit and get pulled over — it’s on me, no one else. If I rip the content label off the mattress — it’s on me, no one else (although don’t know who would be responsible for enforcing these “laws”).

Hugh Amick

Hood River

High impact

The individual responsible for the Eagle Creek fire was not speeding in a car, not talking on his phone while driving; he threw a fire bomb into a forest that was tinder dry. This was not a sophomoric deed; it was arson.

A person 15 years old who throws a fire device and does not expect a fire to start should have been under adult supervision. The fact that nobody died was very fortunate. Having been a fire management officer with 30 years of experience and 15 years on a national fire team, handling fires like the Eagle Creek fire, I know they are truly life threating and very hazardous. The fire conditions that firefighters and aircraft pilots experienced on the Eagle Creek fire was very challenging and extremely dangerous. When a 300-foot wall of flames is coming toward your house or at you, it is very traumatic. Flying aircraft in windy and smoky conditions is extremely hazardous.

This fire caused thousands of individuals to be impacted. Some fearing for their lives, some for their property and animals, some for their economic livelihood. The firefighting effort costing tens of millions of dollars, loss of timber resources in the tens of millions of dollars, and no value can be placed on wildlife lost. Cascade Locks experienced heavy smoke and risk of being overrun with flames, and the town is still suffering from this event.

Businesses closed, other businesses are still feeling the impact from all the closed trails. Interstate commerce, trains and trucks, and local traffic was impacted for months, having to take alternate routes.

This not a simple sophomore act; this individual carried this fire bomb one and a half miles up the trail and chose the place to ignite it, causing disruption and consequences to thousands of individuals and destroyed tens of thousands of acres of forest. This person needs more than a slap on the wrist as retribution for his actions. His actions will have an impact on many people for many years to come.

Timothy Lee

Cascade Locks

Overcome

If you really want to overcome your lack of influence, give rich people what little you have left.

David Warnock

Hood River

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valleycat1 2 weeks, 4 days ago

RE; "Explain" - Regena and Hugh - that 'content tag' or label on pillows and mattresses is not to be removed by the store. Any individual buyer can remove the tag whenever.

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