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Another Voice: Walden announces support for ‘Families in Mental Crisis’ Act

U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River) this week announced that he supports a major mental health reform bill moving through the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Domestic Violence Awareness Month: New legislation gives support and certainty to victims of violence

Recent tragedies cause us again to reflect on the topic of violence in our society.

Another Voice: Proposed Water Protection Measure: It’s not just about Nestlé

In Hood River County, it is impossible to separate water from our local economy or our identity. It is critical for our farms and orchards, as well many other businesses we depend on. With the drought this summer, many families learned firsthand about water conservation.

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ANOTHER VOICE: Oregon sets the pace, and the table, during Farm to School Month

While the U.S. celebrates National Farm to School Month in October, Oregon finds itself at the front of the line in supporting programs that provide healthy, nutritious, and locally-grown foods to children.

Another Voice: Forest Service Chief reviews fire season, calls for two-part solution to fire budget

On Oct. 8, U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell reviewed the 2015 fire season and provided insight into longer term trends and challenges for the agency during testimony before the House Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry Subcommittee. He issued that testimony in a press release Thursday.

Another Voice: Hood River Valley Residents’ Committee celebrates 38 years

At its 38th annual meeting the Hood River Valley Residents’ Committee (HRVRC), welcomed keynote speaker Gil Kelley, director of citywide planning for San Francisco and former planning director of Portland. Kelley, also a part-time resident of Mount Hood, opened his talk with a quote: “In livable cities is the preservation of the wild.”

Simple, but powerful, ways to take a stand against domestic violence

Domestic violence thrives when we are silent, but if we take a stand and work together, we can end domestic violence.

Another voice: Bracing for the worst: Making your own emergency plan

Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to think about the following situations and plan just in case

ANOTHER VOICE: Wyden’s statement on difficult choice of supporting Iran nuclear deal

The Senate has no weightier responsibility this fall than consideration of the nuclear agreement recently negotiated by the United States, key world powers, and Iran.

With learning, anyone can help reduce suicide

An op-ed piece written by Lissa Voorhees and Sandy Moses of Lane County was published, Sept. 11, 2012 by the Eugene Register Guard for Suicide Prevention Week, and was submitted by Susan Gabay of Mosier, a suicide prevention advocate. Her daughter, Susanna, took her own life in 2009 at age 19.

State Forester calls on Oregonians to prevent human-caused fires

“Wildfire activity in Oregon has escalated significantly since Friday, particularly in eastern Oregon,” said Doug Decker, Oregon State Forester.

Another Voice: Rely on facts for a solution on housing affordability and vacation rentals

Hood River is an expensive place to live. Buying or renting a home is more costly than many other communities.

ANOTHER VOICE: Legal pot: now what? Down the rabbit hole?

Following the passages of Measure 91 and Senate Bill 460, medical marijuana dispensaries in Oregon will begin limited cannabis sales to adult consumers on Oct.1.

Hood River housing options are out of reach

The cost of renting or buying a home is increasingly out of reach for all of us. Our housing affordability challenge puts us at risk of losing what has made the Gorge, and our diverse hometowns, a wonderful place to live, work and play.

Another View: Diverse local economy depends upon housing availability to all workers

An incredibly important discussion is happening in Hood River city hall right now. Hiding behind the dry name “Buildable Lands Inventory and Housing Needs Analysis” is a study which raises fundamental questions about what kind of community we will have in coming decades. The report looks at the cost and availability of housing for our growing city over the next 20 years, and the picture it paints isn’t pretty.