Savor the Gorge

A celebration of fresh, local food

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Bringing Health to the Corner Store

An initiative to stock convenience stores with healthy food finds success in Wasco County

Maybe you are one of the 30 percent of Gorge residents that worry about where your next meal will come from. Maybe you are a single parent with no car. You may live in a neighborhood with no grocery store where public transportation is limited. The nearby corner store is your primary source of food. The options are not healthy for you and your family: fried food, soda, candy, or salty, packaged items that leave you feeling empty.

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Begging for an egging

Yesterday I made it to the Farmer’s Market. That alone felt like an accomplishment. Not that I found my way there, but that I remembered. It’s a defeat that’s hard to for me to bear when I get a hankering for something fresh out of the ground on Saturday at 2pm.

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Cooking with Kids

My daughters have been requesting to help more in the kitchen. In fact, they’ve been begging for “cooking lessons.” Per their request, Chicken Picatta was to be the subject of our first cooking lesson. I have my own version of Chicken Picatta (recipe below), but we began by watching a few cooking shows featuring Ina Garten and Giada De Laurentiis cooking their versions, which can be found on YouTube.

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A Bakery Worth its Wood Fire

White Salmon Baking Company creates artisan bread and so much more

Something more than just bread is rising at a little bakery nestled along NE Estes Avenue in White Salmon. It is a bakery looking to connect its community to a better way of eating and to more regionally sourced food.

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Through heritage agricultural techniques, Horseradish Ranch aims for resilience and sustainability

“Hey ladies,” Laura Bazzetta says to her sheep as she walks by them. For the sheep, it is a signal they are moving to a new pasture, so they gather around the fence opening waiting for Bazzetta to take them to a new grazing spot.

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Q and A: Miranda Bray of River Daze Cafe

Miranda Bray was born in Truckee, Calif., and grew up in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. She moved to Hood River with her now-husband, Carey, in 1997. In 2012, she opened River Daze Café in downtown Hood River. She and her husband are also farmers, and source many of their veggies from their own farm and other local farms. River Daze is known for its made-from-scratch menu —including dressings and sandwich spreads, and even its bread and pastries.

Who's your farmer?

From the mountain to the river, these are your local farmers, growers, and producers — working hard to provide fresh produce year-round.

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From the Local Farms to All of Our Tables

How Building a Local Food System Can Help Us Thrive

The Columbia River Gorge looks like a food-rich place. Our valleys are covered in orchards, the eastern hills are golden with wheat, the rivers are famous for salmon, and the forests are full of berries, mushrooms, and wild game. You’d think all of us would be well fed.

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Grassland to Table: Two Gorge-area companies bring naturally raised beef to local plates

Long before the patty hits the bun, ranchers in the Columbia Gorge region work hard to raise their cattle with a gentle touch, hoping their daily toil — and compassion — will pay off down the road. The resulting naturally raised beef finds its way to plates on tables throughout the Gorge in a variety of ways. Here, we take a look at two of them.

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Cooking with Kids

Our family recently moved, and as we are getting settled in our new home, I am reminded that cooking in general doesn’t need to be complex. It’s easy to get whipped up, no pun intended, in complicated ingredients and recipes—which I, of course, love.

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Winery Chefs Pair Their Wines with Fall Dishes

Six stellar Gorge wineries — Hood Crest, Domaine Pouillon, Viento, Wy’East, Maryhill and Aniche — share favorite family dishes, and the wines they love to drink with them. And it’s not the food you might expect.

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Q & A Laurie Walker, Dickey Farms

Dickey Farms in Bingen, Wash., was homesteaded in 1867 as the Henderson/Warner Farms. It became Dickey Farms in 1921 and has been in continual operation for nearly 150 years. The farm is currently managed and owned by the family’s fifth generation: Stanley Dickey, Janice Leis and Laurie Walker. John Dickey is the sixth generation working the farm.

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Bringing the past into the future at Mt. View Orchards

Trina McAlexander, a third-generation Hood River Valley farmer, embraces changes in order to maintain the family farm

When Trina McAlexander returned to Mt. View Orchards in Parkdale two years ago — the family farm where she grew up — she was excited and grateful to be the third generation to work the land. Her enthusiasm hasn’t waned. “I love it — farming is in my blood,” she said. “I was born to do it and I’m honored to do it.”

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Q AND A with Orchardist Dan Klindt

Dane Klindt is a cherry and pear orchardist in Hood River and Wasco counties. Dane and his father, Paul Klindt, along with partner Rich Kortge, own and/or manage about 750 acres of orchards — including five orchards in The Dalles, three located between The Dalles and Dufur, one in Tygh Valley and two in Parkdale.

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Who's your farmer?

From the mountain to the river, these are your local farmers, growers, and producers — working hard to provide fresh produce year-round.

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